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Sniglet

December 23, 2008

Depending on how old you are (or you master of 80's culture) you may remember "Sniglets". A sniglet is a neologism defined as "any word that doesn't appear in the dictionary, but should". The term was created by writer/actor/comedian Rich Hall. (courtesy of Wikipedia.com).

I say we bring back sniglets! Here are some examples:

Carperpetuation: The act, when vacuuming, of running over a piece of string at least a dozen times, then picking it up, examining it, and putting it back on the carpet to give the vacuum cleaner one last chance.

Foodgitives: The food on one side of a TV dinner tray that escapes to the other side. (Hall 1985a: 31)

Furnidents: The indentations left in carpet after moving heavy furniture (Hall 1983)

Glackett: The ball inside a can of spray paint (or other aerosol can) for stirring the contents inside the can. (Hall 1984: 38) (This object is known as a "pea" in the paint industry.)

Pediddel: A car with only one working headlight (Hall 1984: 59)

Premblememblemation: Whenever you drop a letter in the mailbox, you always re-check to make sure it's gone down. (Hall 1984: 66)

Pyramonster: That thing with one big eye on the back of a dollar bill. (Hall 1986: 67) (The pyramid on the Great Seal)

Sniffleridge: The groove running between the nose and the mouth (Hall 1984: 92). (The real name for this structure is the philtrum.)

Timefoolery: Setting the alarm clock ahead of the real time in order to fool yourself into thinking you are not getting up so early.

What made me think about these long lost sniglets? Last Wed. at Lumina in a conversation I meant to say "Lyrics" but said "Slyrics" and then coined a sniglet –

Slyric: the art of slurring lyrics (or making them up) when one does not know all the words of a song.

Do you have any? Fire away!

One Comment leave one →
  1. Lesley permalink
    December 27, 2008 12:23 am

    my husband coined his own phrase for when your nose is running when out in the cold: snotsickles.

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